Utah Biodiesel Supply


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HOW TO TITRATE OIL
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WHY BIODIESEL?
BASICS OF BIODIESEL
ASTM TESTS EXPLAINED
TAX INCENTIVES
MORE BIODIESEL TUTORIALS
BIODIESEL FORUMS
BIODIESEL PROCESSOR
BIODIESEL WASH TANK
63 GAL BIO PROCESSOR
500 GAL BIO PROCESSOR
OIL/BIODIESEL DRYING TANK
OIL COLLECTOR (Supersucker)
SOAP MAKING BOOK
WASTE OIL HEATER
WASTE OIL BOILER
BABINGTON BALL HEATER
** CLICK HERE **
FOR CLEARANCE
& USED ITEMS

Products Are Grouped In Red
By Product Type And
Listed Alphabetically

ACCESSORIES
-BEAKERS (Poly)
-BEAKERS (Glass)
-BUCKET LIDS (Sealable)
-CARBOYS
-COLLECTION DRUM LABELS
-COLLECTION DRUM LIDS
-DRUM HEATER
-DRUM BUNG WRENCH
-ELECTRICAL ITEMS
-FILTERS (Bag Poly Felt/Mesh)
-FILTERS (Brewing)
-FILTERS (Bucket Poly/Nylon)
-FILTERS (Bucket Stainless)
-FILTERS (Custom)
-FILTERS (Drum Mesh)
-FILTERS (Drum Poly/Nylon)
-FILTERS (Drum Stainless)
-FILTERS (Fuel Filter)
-FILTERS (Stainless Mesh)
-FILTERS (Suction)
-FILTERS (Tote Stainless)
-FLOW METER (Digital)
-FUNNEL (Drum-Threaded)
-FUNNEL (Drum-Nonthreaded)
-PTFE PIPE TAPE
-PORTABLE FUEL CARTS
-PLUMBING FITTINGS
-QUICK CONNECT CAMLOCKS
-SAMPLING CUPS
-SCALES
-SEAL PRO LIDS

BIO PRO PROCESSORS
-BIO PRO 150 (Up To 40 Gal)
-BIO PRO 190 (Up To 50 Gal)
-BIO PRO 380 (Up To 100 Gal)
-PRESSURIZED WATER KIT
-BIO PRO INCOSEP
-BIO PRO ACCESSORIES
-BIO PRO CONVERSION KIT
-BIO PRO GO/NO GO KIT
-OXIDATIVE STABILIZER
-PORTABLE FUEL CARTS
-SPRING FLOW 250
-SPRING PRO T76 DRY WASH

BIODIESEL KITS
-BIODIESEL PROCESSOR
-BIODIESEL WASH TANK
-CONVERSION TEST KITS
-METHANOL TEST (Deluxe)
-METHANOL TEST (Ultimate)
-OIL GO/NO GO KIT (BioPro)
-OIL GO/NO GO KIT (General)
-OIL TITRATION KIT (Mini)
-OIL TITRATION KIT (Basic)
-OIL TITRATION KIT (Deluxe)
-PH TESTING STRIPS KIT
-SOAP TEST KITS
-STARTER KIT-BASIC
-STARTER KIT-DELUXE
-STARTER KIT-ULTIMATE
-WATER TEST KIT

BIODIESEL PRODUCTS
-GLYCERIN BAR SOAP
-TIKI TORCH FUEL

BIODIESEL HOSE
-BIODIESEL PUMP HOSE
-BIODIESEL FUEL LINE

BIODIESEL TESTING
-ASTM TESTING
-CONVERSION TEST KIT
-MAGNETIC STIRRER
-OIL GO/NO GO TEST KITS
-PH TESTING STRIPS
-SOAP TEST KITS
-WATER TEST KIT

BIODIESEL TREATMENTS
-BIOCIDE TREATMENT
-OXIDATIVE STABILIZER

BOOKS, DVD's, & PUBLICATIONS
-BIODIESEL BOOKS
-BIODIESEL DVD

CARBOYS
-1 LITER CARBOY
-5 GAL/20 LTR CARBOYS
-CARBOY HOSE BARBS
-CARBOY HOSE CLAMPS
-CARBOY LIDS
-CARBOY SPIGOTS
-CARBOY VENT CAPS
-CARBOY QUICK CONNECTS

CENTRIFUGES
-CENTRIFUGE (Lab)
-CENTRIFUGE TUBES (Lab)
-CENTRIFUGE (Oil Filtering)

CHEMICALS
-BROMOPHENOL BLUE
-HYDROCLHORIC ACID
-ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL
-METHANOL
-PHENOLPHTHALEIN
-POTASSIUM HYDROXIDE
-SODIUM HYDROXIDE
-SULFURIC ACID

DIESEL VEHICLE ITEMS
-BIODIESEL FUEL LINE
-FUEL FILTER HEATERS
-FUEL PUMP

DRUM & BARREL ACCESSORIES
-BIODIESEL PUMP (AC)
-DRUM BUNGS (Poly)
-DRUM BUNG WRENCH
-DRUM CONE (Weldable)
-DRUM CONE FUNNEL
-DRUM FILTER (Poly Mesh)
-DRUM FILTER (Poly/Nylon)
-DRUM FILTER (Stainless)
-DRUM FILTER (For Bungs)
-DRUM HEATER (250 W)
-DRUM HEATER (300 W)
-DRUM HEATER (1000 W)
-DRUM HEATER (1200 W)
-DRUM LABELS
-DRUM LIDS (Locking)
-DRUM PUMP (Electric)
-DRUM PUMP (Lever)
-DRUM PUMP (Rotary)
-DRUM PUMP (Siphon)
-METHANOL PUMP (AC)

DRY WASHING SUPPLIES
-BD ZORB MEDIA
-DRY WASH PUMP (Air)
-DRY WASH PUMP (Electric)
-DRY WASH RESIN (DW-R10)
-SOAP TEST KITS
-SPRING PRO T76 DRY WASH
-STAINLESS MESH SCREEN

FILTERS
-BAG/SOCK (Poly)
-BEER BREWING (Stainless)
-BUCKET (Poly/Nylon)
-BUCKET (Stainless)
-CENTRIFUGE
-CUSTOM FILTERS (Stainless)
-DRUM (Poly Mesh)
-DRUM (Poly/Nylon)
-DRUM (Stainless Steel)
-FUEL FILTERS (Bowl)
-FUEL FILTER HEATERS
-STAINLESS MESH SCREEN
-SUCTION / PUMP FILTERS
-TOTE (Stainless Steel)

HEATERS
-ALCOHOL STOVE
-BABINGTON BALL HEATER
-DRUM HEATER (250 W)
-DRUM HEATER (300 W)
-DRUM HEATER (1000 W)
-DRUM HEATER (1200 W)
-FUEL FILTER HEATERS
-HEAT EXCHANGER (Plate)
-HEAT EXCHANGER (Tube)
-HEATING ELEMENT (1500 W)
-INLINE HEATER (1000 W)

LAB EQUIPMENT
-32 oz/ 950 mL BOTTLE
-BEAKERS (Glass Multi-sized)
-BEAKERS (Poly 100mL)
-BEAKERS (Poly 250mL)
-BEAKERS (Poly Multi-sized)
-BIODIESEL LAMP
-BOTTLE (Poly 1000mL)
-BURETTES (Glass)
-CENTRIFUGE (Hand Operated)
-CENTRIFUGE TUBES (15 mL)
-CENTRIFUGE TUBES (50 mL)
-ERLENMEYER FLASKS
-GRADUATED CYLINDERS
-GRADUATED PITCHERS
-HYDROMETER (Methanol)
-PH TESTING STRIPS KIT
-PIPETTES (Disposable 3ml)
-PIPETTES (Glass 1, 10, 25)
-PIPETTE PUMPS (2, 10, 25)
-PIPETTE STANDS
-PORTABLE STOVE
-SAMPLING CUPS (Poly)
-SAMPLING VIALS (45 mL)
-SAMPLING VIALS (100 mL)
-SEPARATORY FUNNEL
-SCALES
-SYRINGES (Labelled)
-SYRINGES (Multi-Packs)
-THERMOMETER (5" Pocket)
-THERMOMETER (12" Probe)
-TITRATION KITS
-WASH BOTTLES (Poly)
-WATER TEST KIT

MAGNETIC STIRRERS
-MINI STIRRER
-STANDARD STIRRER
-STAINLESS STIRRER
-HEATED STIRRER

OIL COLLECTION
-BARREL PUMP
-COLLECTION DRUM FILTERS
-COLLECTION DRUM LABELS
-COLLECTION PUMP (Electric)
-COLLECTION PUMP (Gas)
-LOCKING DRUM LIDS
-OIL GO/NO GO KITS
-OIL TITRATION KITS
-SAMPLING CUPS
-SAMPLING VIALS

OIL TREATMENTS
-BIOCIDE TREATMENT
-OXIDATIVE STABILIZER

PROMOTIONAL ITEMS
-APPAREL-Shirts & Hats
-BIODIESEL SAMPLES
-BUMPER STICKERS
-EMBLEMS
-LICENSE PLATES
-VINYL DECALS

PROCESSOR SUPPLIES
-PROCESSOR KIT
-CATALYST SCALES
-ELECTRICAL
-METHANOL PUMP
-PROCESSOR FITTINGS
-PROCESSOR PUMP
-STEEL DRUM CONE
-TEMP GAUGE
-PROCESSOR VALVES

PUMPS
-BIODIESEL PUMP (AC)
-DRY WASH PUMPS
-FLOW METER (Digital)
-FUEL PUMP (Vehicle)
-FUEL HOSE (Vehicle)
-INDUSTRIAL GEAR PUMP
-METHANOL PUMP (AC)
-METHANOL PUMP (Rotary)
-METHANOL PUMP (Siphon)
-OIL/BIODIESEL PUMP (AC)
-OIL/BIODIESEL PUMP (Gas)
-PORTABLE GEAR PUMP (AC)
-PORTABLE FUEL CARTS
-PIPETTE PUMPS (2, 10, 25)
-PROCESSOR PUMP
-SULFURIC ACID PUMP

SAFETY EQUIPMENT
-SAFETY GOGGLES

SCALES
-TITRATION SCALES
-CATALYST SCALE (GOOD)
-CATALYST SCALE (BETTER)

SOAP MAKING SUPPLIES
-ESSENTIAL OILS
-GLYCERIN BAR SOAP
-GLYCERIN LIQUID SOAP
-POTASSIUM HYDROXIDE
-SODIUM HYDROXIDE
-SOAP MAKING KIT
-SOAP MAKING BOOK

TITRATION SUPPLIES
-MAGNETIC STIRRER
-OIL TEST KIT
-SAMPLING CUPS
-SYRINGES (Labelled)
-SYRINGES (Multi-Packs)
-TITRATION GO/NO GO KIT
-TITRATION KIT (Mini)
-TITRATION KIT (Basic)
-TITRATION KIT (Deluxe)
-TITRATION BEAKERS
-TITRATION CHEMICALS
-TITRATION PIPETTES
-TITRATION SCALES

WATER WASHING SUPPLIES
-STEEL DRUM CONE
-WASH TANK KIT
-WASH TANK DRYING KIT
-WASH TANK BUBBLERS
-WASH TANK FITTINGS
-WASH TANK HEATER 1000 W
-WASH TANK HEATER 250 W
-WASH TANK MISTERS
--Dry Pro Drying Nozzle
--Fogg-It Misters (5 Types)
--Mist Pro Mister
--Wash Pro Mister
--Orbit 5 Head Misting Set
-WASH TANK PARTS
-WASH TANK STANDPIPE
-WASH TANK VALVES
ASTM TESTING
BIODIESEL COOPS/GROUPS
BUYING BIODIESEL
FINDING A DIESEL
LOG YOUR BIODIESEL
SHARE YOUR PICTURES
WE COLLECT OIL
OTHER HELPFUL WEBSITES
BIODIESEL TUTORIAL
COLLECTIVE BIODIESEL
BIODIESEL PICTURES
BIODIESEL LOG
MAKE BIODIESEL
MURPHYS MACHINES
NEEDASTICKER
RILLA BIOFUELS
Official PayPal Seal


Getting Started Making Biodiesel
by Graydon Blair of
Utah Biodiesel Supply

INTRODUCTION
Welcome to our Getting Started page! We've packed this page with everything you'll need to know from A to Z to get you started making Biodiesel. When you make your own fuel, you not only get the benefits of running biodiesel, but you get the savings benefits of making it yourself. In many cases, when produced from oil obtained for free, Biodiesel really can be produced for under $1.00 a gallon. This page will give you the basics of what it takes to make Biodiesel as well as give you some great resources for getting started.

Soon, you could be making fuel for next to nothing and enjoying the great benefits of producing and using your own fuel. So, let's get started! To make things easy, we've grouped the page into the sections listed below. As you read through the page, you'll see links that say
BACK TO TOP. If you click on them, it'll bring you back to the top of the page allowing you to jump quickly from section to section.


Be Sure To Also Check Out Our Tutorial Videos!
Also, after you've read through this article, be sure to visit our Biodiesel Tutorial Page to learn more about Biodiesel and how to make it.

Click Here To See The Video Tutorial Page


WHAT IS BIODIESEL
To begin, let's first talk about what Biodiesel is:

Biodiesel is a replacement for diesel fuel that can be used in most diesel engines. It has properties that allow it to burn and perform similar to diesel fuel making it an ideal replacement to petroleum based diesel fuel.

Biodiesel can be made from plant oils such as soybean oil, canola oil, cottonseed oil, and others or from animal fats such as beef or chicken tallow or pork lard. It can also be made from used fryer oil that's discarded by restaurants as a waste product; which is what we'll be focusing on. So, yes, that really means you can make fuel out of what restaurants consider to be garbage! I tend to think of it as liquid gold...and soon you may think the same as well!

Because Biodiesel can be used as a direct replacement for diesel fuel in most diesel powered vehicles, this means that you can make Biodiesel yourself at a fraction of the cost per gallon of what you would normally pay for diesel fuel! In fact, in most cases people are producing their own Biodiesel for less than a $1.50 per gallon! Not bad eh?
Learn More About What Biodiesel Is Here


STEP 1 - FINDING AN OIL SOURCE | BACK TO TOP
Before you do anything else you need to secure a good source of oil. This is by far the most important thing you can do before attempting to make Biodiesel!

Several people have asked if it's possible to make Biodiesel from new oil. The answer is yes. The problem is that new oil has risen in price quite a bit in the past couple years; so much so that it typically doesn't make economical sense for a small home brewer to use it as a raw feedstock to make Biodiesel out of. For example, new Soybean oil runs about $3.65 a gallon. Add on top of that $0.85 to $1.25 a gallon production cost and you can see that it just doesn't make sense for most people wanting to produce their own Biodiesel to use new oil to make it from.

To see what the going rate for "New Organic Oil" is, visit The USDA National Weekly Ag Energy Round-Up page. They publish weekly commodity prices for new & used organic oils. You can see pricing for Soybean, Corn, and Edible Tallow Oils as well as pricing for Yellow Grease (waste vegetable oil) and a few other fuel related commodity prices. Because most of their pricing is in pounds, a handy tip is to use 7.56 lbs of oil to a gallon to figure out the cost per gallon.

For most people, the best option to make their own Biodiesel is to use waste vegetable oil (WVO). One problem with this scenario is figuring out where to get the oil from. In most cases, it will mean getting it from a restaurant or from someone that can sell waste oil that's been prefiltered. We recommend that it be filtered down to at least 400 microns or smaller (microns is a size rating typically used on filters, the smaller the number the finer the filter). If you're investigating purchasing waste oil, ensure that it's been filtered and dewatered. You'll also want to test it for something called it's "Free Fatty Acid Level" (FFA %). We explain how to do this a little later in the article. By knowing the FFA %, you can get an idea of how difficult it will be to use the oil to make Biodiesel out of.

The most common place people get waste vegetable oil is from local restaurants in the communities where they live. This is because several restaurants use grease fryers to cook the food they sell. Over time the grease deteriorates and has to be replaced. Higher quality restaurants tend to change their oil fryers on a fairly frequent basis while fast food restaurants may let it go a little longer.

I recommend finding a restaurant that changes their fryer oil at least once a week or more often. The more they change the oil, the better quality the waste oil will be which will translate into more biodiesel for you.

Another tip you'll want to look for is oil that is made from pure vegetable oil instead of animal fat, lard, or tallows. While fats and tallows can be made into biodiesel, the gel point of these oils is much higher than vegetable based oils. Because the gel point is so high, biodiesel made from such oils will often gel at a much higher temperature causing filter clogging problems. Look for Soy Bean, Canola, Peanut, Corn, or other vegetable oils in the ingredients and you'll be set. If you're unsure about what the oil is made from, just ask to see the original container that the oil came in. It'll be printed on the label.

For more information on the gel points of different oils, check out these handy reference materials:
NREL Pamphlet - Pamphlet on different gel points of Biodiesel. Based on the guide below
NREL Biodiesel Handling & Use Guidelines Incredible resource containing information on biodiesel

Once you've identified your oil source, you'll need to figure out how to transport it back to your processing area. A truck, some barrels, and a pump always come in handy.

Below is our favorite pump that can be used for collecting oil.

Click here to see more information this great pump

How We Collect Oil
Here at Utah Biodiesel Supply we collect so much oil that we needed to upgrade to something a little more "industrial-grade" to make collecting quicker and easier. To do this, we bought a lift-gate, threw it on the back of a pickup, and now we collect oil by swapping out full barrels of oil for empty ones. We seal the barrels with barrel rings and try to collect them when they're about half-full. One day I took a camera along so we could show everyone how we do it. You can check it out here. Click here to see how we collect oil

For more information on collecting waste oil, click on these great articles below:
Collecting Oil 101 - Tips & Tricks Murphys Machines Guide To Collecting Oil
Collaborative Tutorial Guide On Negotiating For Oil


STEP 2 - TESTING THE OIL | BACK TO TOP
Before committing to take on an oil source, it's important to know the quality of the oil you'll be using to make Biodiesel. Like making a good meal, it's important to start with good ingredients. Making Biodiesel is really no different. So, what makes oil "Good" or "Bad"? Two main factors really.
A How WET the oil is and
B How ACIDIC the oil is.
Find really wet, highly acidic oil and your life with Biodiesel isn't going to be fun.
Find dry, fairly low acidic oil, and making Biodiesel becomes much easier and fun to produce!

Testing Oil For Water:
Below we've compiled some links to articles that will show you how to test for water content.

Test #1 Basic Method For Testing For Water
Heat up the oil & watch for bubbles.

Lyle Rudensey of Biolyle.com testing for water

Test #2 Quantitative Water Test
Weigh the oil before & after applying heat

Test #3 Using a Water Test Kit
Another way to measure for water content is with an industrial water test kit. We carry one that has been extremely popular with homebrewers and with professional Biodiesel producers. It was invented by Mobil 1 to detect water in hydraulic fluid. It's extremely accurate and works well for detecting water in oil and in biodiesel.

B- Testing Oil For Acid Content
When making Biodiesel, it's important to know what the acid level in the oil is. This is because when Biodiesel is produced, one of the chemicals used will be a strong base. Typically Sodium Hydroxide or Potassium Hydroxide. If the oil is very acidic, you'll need to compensate for this by adding more base than normal to make the reaction occur. This is because part of your base chemical will be neutralized by the acid in the oil. By knowing the acid content you'll be able to add enough extra base chemical so that there's enough left over after neutralizing the acid to still make Biodiesel.

The method used to measure the acid content in the oil is called a Titration. It's performed by taking a sample of oil, adding it to some pH neutral alcohol, typically isopropyl alcohol, adding a pH indicator to the mixture and then slowly adding measured amounts of a solution of water with a small amount of the base chemical that you'll be using to produce your Biodiesel with.

Once the basic solution neutralizes the acid in the oil, the pH will go higher (low pH = acidic solution, high pH = basic solution), indicating that it's been neutralized. The pH indicator will then turn a different color to let you know that you've neutralized the acid. There are several types of pH indicators that can be used to do a Biodiesel titration, but the most common is Phenolphthalein. Phenol Red and Turmeric can also be used as well.

Click below to see how to titrate oil with a Mini-Titration Kit

Click here & select "watch in high quality" for better resolution

For a great description of how a titration is performed, visit these great articles below:
Utah Biodiesel Supply Titration Guide This one is the one we use.
Murphys Machines Guide To Titration Great step by step instructions.
Collaborative Tutorial Guide To Titrating Oil Awesome visuals with step by step instructions
Collaborative Tutorial Guide To Titrating With Turmeric Shows how to titrate with Turmeric

Check out our great selection of titration kits!

Click here to see our kits


STEP 3 - FILTERING THE OIL | BACK TO TOP
Before you can react the oil into Biodiesel, it's important that it be filtered to remove any food particles or other contaminants. There are several ways to filter oil, but one of the easiest methods is to obtain an open top 55 gallon drum and use a 55 gallon poly or metal drum filter. We've found these to be extremely effective and very simple to use. Most filters will come with a micron rating on them. The micron rating indicates the size of the holes in the filter. The smaller the number, the smaller the holes will be in the filter. We find that 400 micron works best for the equipment we use. We stock several micron sizes to match the equipment you'll be using.

Click here to see our poly drum filters.
Click here to see our stainless steel drum filters.

Click below to see how we filter our oil at Utah Biodiesel Supply
How We Filter Oil


STEP 4 - MAKING A TEST BATCH | BACK TO TOP

One of the best ways to get started with Biodiesel is by making a small test batch of Biodiesel. It's extremely simple and you can get almost everything you'll need at a local grocery store to make it with.

Click on the video below to see how to make a quick test batch.

Below are two great sites that walk you through making a test batch step by step:
Kitchen-Biodiesel.com Great website with excellent visuals to get you started.
Collaborative Tutorial Great article that details making a test batch


STEP 5 - OBTAINING PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT | BACK TO TOP
Like all good hobbies, doing them right requires getting the proper equipment. Making biodiesel is no different. With the proper equipment, biodiesel is much easier to produce. Below is a list of the things I believe any serious biodieseler should obtain before getting started.

Recommended Equipment
A) Oil Collection Containers
B) Oil Transfer Capability
C) Oil Filtering Capability
D) A Biodiesel Processor
E) A Biodiesel Washing Vessel
F) A Biodiesel Storage Container
G) Transfer Pumps
H) Titration Kit

Completely Automated Processors
These processors can dewater, process, wash, and dry biodiesel all at the push of a button. This is what we personally make Biodiesel in at Utah Biodiesel Supply and we've loved them! I tell folks that you'd have to drag me kicking & screaming to make me make Biodiesel any other way. We've just been incredibly impressed with them & love using them! We started making Biodiesel years ago in a 55 gallon drum with a paint stirrer. We then moved up to a water heater based processor, and then one day we found these & have never looked back! They're THAT cool!
BioPro 150
Automated Processor
Up To 40 Gallons
BioPro 190
Automated Processor
Up To 50 Gallons
BioPro 380
Automated Processor
50, 75 or 100 Gallons!
Click the video below to see how a BioPro 190 works

Click Here For Higher Resolution Video

  • E) A Biodiesel Washing Vessel
    After you produce biodiesel it's necessary to wash it to remove any contaminants such as excess methanol, soap, or left over catalyst. A good wash tank will have the ability to mist wash or bubble wash the biodiesel in an effective manner. I really like using
    Stand-Pipe Biodiesel Wash Tanks made from semi-transparent poly barrels mounted on a wooden stand. They work exceptionally well and are relatively inexpensive to build.

    Plans & Kits
    We carry a set of plans as well as a kit for building such a wash tank out of a 55 gallon poly drum. It's based on something called a Standpipe Wash Tank as seen on the Collaborative Biodiesel Tutorial site.
    55 Gallon Based
    Biodiesel Wash Tank Kit
    55 Gallon Based
    Biodiesel Wash Tank Plans


  • F) A Biodiesel Storage Container
    Once you've produced and washed your Biodiesel, you'll need something to put it in until it's used. The most common storage containers for completed biodiesel are 55 gallon steel or poly drums placed on drum dolly's. This makes a great portable method for moving fuel around to a vehicle when it's needed.

    You can also store the biodiesel in
    large water jugs (called carboys) or even in gas cans. Just be sure you have the ability to seal whatever you put your completed biodiesel in so that dirt or debris don't fall into it.

    We're convinced that poly tanks are the best for storing relatively small amounts of Biodiesel (less than 200 gallons) for long periods of time. This is because Biodiesel contains a small amount of water in it regardless of how dry you get it and over time it can rust the inside of a 55 gallon metal drum causing fuel quality problems. A poly drum on the other hand will keep the biodiesel in great shape. Just be sure to fill the drums up all the way and properly seal them and you should be able to easily store the Biodiesel for up to 6 months with no problems.

    Some have gone even longer than that without a problem but if you are planning on selling the fuel the NREL Biodiesel Use & Handling Guidelines call for storing it no longer than 6 months. This is because Biodiesel is an organic substance and therefore is subject to oxidation which can break it down. Over time the oxidation can cause the Biodiesel to become somewhat acidic.

  • G) Transfer Pumps
    Making biodiesel will involve a lot of transferring liquids around from one place to the other. This can be done using several hoses and gravity or you can use transfer pumps to help out. Transfer pumps come in all sorts of shapes, sizes, configurations, and layouts. I've seen anything from a simple hand-operated barrel pump to elaborate powered models. If you're making lot's of biodiesel, a powered pump can really come in handy.

    Here's a listing of the pumps you'll need.
    • Oil Collection & Transfer Pump
      Can be used to transfer waste oil, filtered oil, and to fill the processor with oil.
      Barrel, Electric, Pneumatic, or Trash pumps work well.
      If electric, be sure it's rated to handle thick oil.
    • Methanol Pump
      Should ONLY be used to transfer Methanol.
      Siphon or Barrel pumps work well.
      EPDM, Buna, or Teflon seals are recommended.
      Viton seals aren't recommended.
    • Biodiesel Pump
      Can be used to transfer completed biodiesel to and from containers
      Electric, Barrel, Siphon, Pneumatic, or any fuel transfer pump will work well.
      Viton or Teflon (PTFE) seals are recommended.


  • H) Titration Kit
    Every titration kit should have at minimum the following items:
    A Scale capable of weighing down to a gram
    Ph Indicator Can be Phenol Red, Phenolphthalein, or Tumeric
    - Electric Ph Meters are not recommended
    Isopropyl Alcohol About 1 pint. Preferrably 92% or higher
    Lye (NaOH) or Caustic Potash (KOH) - About 5-10 grams will be needed.
    (1) Container capable of measuring in 10 ml increments up to at least 50 ml
    (3) Containers capable of holding 50 ml of fluid
    (3) Syringes or Eyedroppers graduated in 1 ml increments
    (1) Container capable of holding 1 liter of fluid--preferrably sealable

    We carry titration kits that comes with everything you'll need to titrate except the isopropyl alcohol and distilled water; both of which can be picked up fairly easily at a local grocery store.

    Click here to see our titration kits


  • STEP 6 - OBTAINING CHEMICALS | BACK TO TOP
    Methanol is used in Biodiesel Production as part of the chemical reaction. When used, the Methanol reacts with the Waste Vegetable Oil to make Biodiesel, Soap, and Glycerin.

    To locate methanol we recommend using the Murphys Machines Chemical Locator
    Click here to see this free locating tool!

    You'll also need to obtain either Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) or Potassium Hydroxide (KOH). Sodium Hydroxide is commonly called Lye and can be found at most chemical stores and occasionally even in plumbing stores. Potassium Hydroxide, commonly called Caustic Potash, is a little harder to find, but is well worth the effort.

    Either one of these chemicals, when used to make biodiesel, will act as a catalyst to get a chemical reaction going between the Methanol and the Oil. When purchasing either one of these chemicals, be sure to find chemicals that are as pure as possible. I recommend getting Sodium Hydroxide that is at least 98% pure. If Potassium Hydroxide is used, try to find it in at least 90% purity.

    My personal favorite catalyst to use is Potassium Hydroxide (KOH). It dissolves easier in Methanol, makes runnier Glycerin, and when everything's done, it doesn't clog the plumbing on processors like Sodium Hydroxide can. It will usually cost a little more to use, but the extra cost is worth it.

    To make it easy for you, we sell both of these chemicals.
    Click here to see our Sodium Hydroxide.
    Click here to see our Potassium Hydroxide.


    STEP 7 - PRE-TREATING THE OIL | BACK TO TOP
    Before the oil can be made into Biodiesel, it's important to make sure that it's ready to be processed. In Step 2 we discussed testing the oil for water and acid content. Now it's time to talk about how to deal with oil with water and/or high acidic content.

    Dewatering
    There are several ways to dewater oil, however, one of the most simple ways to do it is to let the oil settle. Water and oil really don't like each other and with enough time, the water will simply sink to the bottom and can then be removed. To help this process out, you can also heat the oil up. This allows the oil molecules to expand allowing the water molecules to fall out of suspension easier.


    A simple way of doing this is to place the oil in a 55 gallon drum and then heat the drum up using an electric drum heater. Once the oil is up to temperature, allow it to sit that way for several hours. Then, simply drain off the water from the bottom.

    This can be accomplished by sucking the water out by using a barrel pump to draw the water off the bottom or by placing a small hole with a stopper in the bottom of the drum to drain the water off with. We've seen people weld cones to the bottom of drums or even something as simple as a stand-pipe wash tank style tank where they can drain the water off the bottom and then drain the oil from the stand pipe.

    For a great example of a setup using a settling tank for dewatering, click here.

    Another excellent method to dewater the oil is to simply heat the oil and recirculate it on top of itself for several hours. This method is usually used to dewater finished Biodiesel, but will work equally well for dewatering oil before it's used as well.

    Click here to see how to build a dewatering tank


    Reducing Acid Level
    If the oil you obtain contains a high free fatty acid level, then you may want to consider reducing the acid level in the oil before using it to make Biodiesel with. Making Biodiesel from high free fatty acid feedstock can be done, but it's kind of a pain. The reason is because you end up using so much extra catalyst that by the time you have Biodiesel, you'll also have a lot of soap to deal with. Soap is the by-product that comes from neutralizing the acid with a strong base. It's just not fun to deal with.

    Reducing the acid content can be done several ways.
    Here's two effective methods that we're aware of.

    Caustic Stripping
    This involves dissolving some of the strong base (either Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide) into water and then adding the mixture to the oil. This will cause the free fatty acids in the oil to bind to the strong base and form soap. The soap is then removed from the oil, the oil is dewatered, and then can be used to make Biodiesel with.

    This method, while effective, will decrease the yield of Biodiesel you'll obtain from it because a portion of the oil gets converted into soap. While we at Utah Biodiesel Supply have never used caustic stripping as a means of reducing free fatty acids, we know that it can be done and is effective. We just prefer to use the second method.

    For more information on Caustic Stripping, we recommend the following:
    Article on Caustic Stripping Rick of B100 Supply wrote this great thread
    Infopop Search Searched for Caustic Stripping at the Infopop Biodiesel Forum
    Google Search This links to a Google search using biodiesel and caustic stripping as key words.

    Acid Esterification
    This method uses sulfuric acid to modify the free fatty acids (FFA's) in the oil so that they can still be made into Biodiesel. It's the preferred method to use among biodieselers when dealing with high free fatty acid oil. The reason it's preferred is because instead of converting the FFA's into soap like caustic stripping does, it actually modifies the acid chains and allows them to be converted into Biodiesel. This means that the yield won't suffer as much as it does in caustic stripping.

    There are several recipes for performing acid esterification, but the one most commonly used is to use 1 mL of sulfuric acid for every liter of oil you have. For instance, if you have 190 liters of oil, you'd use 190 mL of sulfuric acid. While this method works extremely well, it's important that the oil be extremely dry before using this method. If it's not dry the sulfuric acid will react with the water istead and the reaction won't occur as readily. It's also important that the sulfuric acid be highly concentrated; usually 95% pure or better is recommended.

    This is the method that our automated BioPro processors utilize to handle high free fatty acid oil. We've seen it work extremely well. We've been able to make Biodiesel from some pretty nasty oil using this method and have become extremly impressed with how well it will work.

    There are some downsides to using acid esterification. The biggest downside is that it takes more time for the reaction to occur. In fact, most people that attempt to do it typically don't wait long enough for the reaction to work and run into problems. When using this method plan on adding at least 6-8 hours of additional reaction time for the esterification process to work right. Keep the oil as dry as possible, use only highly concentrated sulfuric acid, and give it enough time and you should see good results. Another important note on using this method. Be sure your equipment can handle sulfuric acid. Black steel and sulfuric acid don't like each other. They can get along in diluted quantities for a while (1 mL to 1 liter is somewhat diluted) but it's not recommended.

    For more information on using this method, we highly recommend our sulfuric acid biodiesel tutorial article!. Click here to go directly to the article.


    If Acid Esterification interests you, we carry Sulfuric Acid in a couple different sizes.
    Click here to see our selection.


    STEP 8 - PROCESSING BIODIESEL | BACK TO TOP
    During this step you'll actually be producing the Biodiesel. It's where the magic happens and where the actual reactions occur that allow you to make Biodiesel from organic oil. Before we get started, it's important that you practice good safety.

    MAKING BIODIESEL CAN BE DANGEROUS!
    You'll be dealing with Methanol (a poisonous alcohol), a strong base of either Sodium Hydroxide (commonly called Lye) or Potassium Hydroxide (commonly called Caustic Potash), both of which can burn you if they get on your skin, oil (which can be downright messy), and heat and electricity. YOU WILL NEED TO BE CAREFUL! YOU CAN GET HURT!


    LEGAL STUFF (you must agree to this before proceeding)
    By reading the rest of this article, you hereby absolve ('hold harmless') Utah Biodiesel Supply, MGBJ Enterprises, and any of it's employees or staff from any and all responsibility for any potential harm to person(s) or property that may result from the use or misuse (accidental or intentional) of this information.

    You understand that Methanol (Methyl-Alcohol), Sodium Hydroxide (Lye, NaOH), Potassium Hydroxide (Caustic Potash, KOH), and Sulfuric Acid (H2SO4) are highly corrosive chemical substances and may be dangerous or harmful if misused.

    You hereby accept full and sole responsibility for any potential harm to person(s) or property that may result from the use or misuse (accidental or intentional) of this information.

    If you don't agree with the above, discontinue reading this article and proceed no further.

    Still reading? Great! Now that we've got that out of the way we can proceed. While Biodiesel can be done in a safe manner, it's extremely important that you practice good safety techniques and watch what you're doing. You're dealing with some pretty dangerous chemicals and if you don't watch it you really can get hurt. Respect it for what it is, treat it safely, be cautious and prudent and things will probably go well.

    Below are two MUST READ guides on Biodiesel Safety.
    Biodiesel Safety Article from the Collaborative Biodiesel Tutorial
    Biodiesel Best Practices Excellent guide from Penn State on producing Biodiesel safely.


    Here are some additional precautions we also recommend following:

    PRECAUTIONS
    1- You'll be dealing with some fairly caustic chemicals, an alcohol called Methanol, fair amounts of heat, and the transferring of flammable fluids from one container to container so it's a good idea to have a fire extinguisher around that is capable of putting out an oil based fire.

    2- Biodiesel should always be made in a well-ventilated area away from children and pets with the proper safety equipment utilized.

    3- Before making large batches of Biodiesel, check with your local municipality and fire marshall to ensure that any chemicals, alcohol, or other substances you will use are being stored and used within the proper laws and ordinances for your area. Some areas refer back to state and federal fire codes. It's always a good idea to check before you get started.
    Click Here for some helpful tips on working with your local municipality & fire department

    4- Using home made Biodiesel in a diesel engine vehicle may void your manufacturer's warranty. Although the steps outlined to make it are fairly bullet proof and have been tested in several thousands of vehicles all over the world, there's no guarantee your engine manufacturer will honor your warranty.

    5- Biodiesel is considered a fuel so if you plan to use it in a vehicle for on-road use, it may be subject to taxes. Check with your state and federal taxing agencies if in question.

    6- Biodiesel itself, when properly made, is actually quite safe. It's less toxic than table salt and degrades faster than sugar. It has a higher flash point (point at which it ignites) than regular petrodiesel and if spilled isn't considered toxic.


    OK, with that out of the way, let's start discussing how to make Biodiesel.

    Below is the basic theory of what you'll be doing to produce it.

    In really simple terms here's what happens:
    1- Put your pre-treated oil in a processor
    2- Heat the oil up to about 130-135 deg F (make sure your processor can handle the heat!)
    3- Figure out how much catalyst (lye or caustic potash) you'll need (Titration)
    4- Add the strong base (lye or caustic potash) to the methanol to make methoxide
    5- Add the methoxide to the oil & mix it all up
    6- Let it separate & pull off the glycerin
    7- Wash it & dry it
    8- Add it to the tank & drive on down the road!

    Here's the basic recipe
    1- Start with a known amount of oil.
    2- Oil Amount X 0.20 = Methanol required
    3- Titrate Oil = Strong Base required
    4- Mix Methanol & Strong Base together until fully dissolved
    4- Heat oil to 130-135 ° F
    5- Kill heat source & add methoxide to oil
    6- Mix for 2 hours
    7- Allow to sit for 18-24 hours
    8- Drain off glycerin
    9- Wash out excess contaminants
    10- Remove any water by drying the Biodiesel
    11- Add final product to diesel tank
    12- Drive away!

    EXAMPLE:
    1- Add 100 liters of oil to processor & turn on the heat
    2- Measure out 20 liters of Methanol
    3- Titrate oil using KOH as strong base
    4- Assume a Titration of 3.
    5- 3 + 7 = 10 grams per liter. 10 X 100 = 1,000 grams
    4- Add 1,000 grams of KOH to the methanol
    5- Allow the KOH to fully dissolve
    6- Once the oil hits 130 deg F, kill the heat
    7- Slowly add the KOH/Methanol mixture to the processor
    8- Mix everything in the processor for at least 2 hours
    9- After 2 hours, allow it to sit for 18-24 hours
    10- After it's sat, drain off the glycerin
    11- Transfer it to a wash tank
    12- Wash and dry the Biodiesel
    13- Once dry, add it to the fuel tank & drive away!

    For a great analogy of what is going on chemically during the reaction, Click Here!

    For more detailed information on making Biodiesel, visit the links below:
    Make Biodiesel Website A great tutorial page on making biodiesel complete with plans for building biodiesel processing equipment.
    Kitchen Biodiesel Explains the basisc of making a small batch.
    Wikipedia Biodiesel Recipe Well written recipe for making a small batch of Biodiesel. I believe it's based off of Mike Pelly's recipe.
    World Famous Dr. Pepper Method - Part 1 Part I of a recipe for making a small batch of Biodiesel in a Dr. Pepper bottle. Followed by many the first time they make biodiesel.
    Dangerous Laboratories Great instructions for making a batch of Biodiesel for the first time. Complete with pictures and detailed instructions.
    Infopop Biodiesel Forum Great place to post questions and learn about making Biodiesel.
    Appleseed Biodiesel Instructions Instructions for making Biodiesel in a hot water heater.


    STEP 9 - WASHING & DRYING BIODIESEL | BACK TO TOP
    After you've processed your oil into Biodiesel you'll need to wash it. The most common way to wash Biodiesel is with water. I know that sounds weird to add water to something you just tried to get water out of, but follow me on this one.

    When we make Biodiesel, we always add more methanol than we need to. This is to ensure that the chemical reaction goes to full completion. After the reaction has occured, the majority of the methanol is now a part of the actual Biodiesel (however it's now chemically different), but the extra methanol that wasn't used typically will end up in the glycerin. There also is a portion of the excess methanol that ends up in suspension in the actual Biodiesel itself.

    Now Methanol is a funny molecule. It's something called a bi-polar molecule. This means that one part of the molecule can hold onto Biodiesel molecules (kind of like "sticking to it") and the other part can hold onto some of the glycerin, soap, and catalyst. So, now we have finished Biodiesel, Glycerin, and some excess methanol hanging around in the Biodiesel itself holding onto some "contaminants". In order to cleanse the Biodiesel, we wash it.

    How Washing Works
    If water is used, the methanol molecule likes water more than it likes Biodiesel and the water pulls the methanol and all the other stuff hanging onto it down into the water layer. Wash it enough and all that excess methanol will wash right out along with all the other stuff it was holding onto.

    If a dry wash system is used, the same process essentially happens as well. The dry resin or powder absorbs or catches onto the glycerin, soap, & methanol allowing the Biodiesel to slip on by.

    We personally still use water washing here at Utah Biodiesel Supply when we produce our Biodiesel and really don't plan on changing anytime soon. We think it works that well and we don't have a problem disposing of our waste water. It just goes down our drain. We do have an industrial waste water discharge permit and our sewage treatment plant has tested our water & knows what's in it and knows who we are. It cost us $125/year to discharge up to 425 gallons of waste water per week. We think it's a great deal!

    To learn more about washing Biodiesel, be sure to visit these great sites:
    Using A Standpipe Wash Tank Learn how to use a Biodiesel Standpipe Wash Tank!
    Washing Biodiesel Great article from the Collaborative Biodiesel Tutorial.
    Breaking Emulsions With Salt If you water wash, one day you'll make an emulsion. It's just gonna happen. Here's a quick way to break them!

    We stock a full supply of great Biodiesel Washing Devices. Everything from misters to complete wash tank kits and everything in between. We've even taken videos of each mister misting to show the different flow rates.


    Click on any of the pictures above to see more information on a misting product.
    Click Here to see more washing supplies.


    DRYING BIODIESEL
    If you use water to wash your Biodiesel, you'll need to dry it when you're done. Diesel engines REALLY HATE water in the fuel. It'll kill a fuel injector really fast and can corrode the fuel injection systems. It's just not pretty!

    So, now that you know you want to get rid of the water, let's talk about how it can be done. First off, there's a million different ways to dry Biodiesel. You'll find them scattered all over the internet if you look. For our purposes, we'll just discuss some of the more simple ways to do it.

    Use The Sun
    One of the easiest ways to do it is to set your Biodiesel out in the hot sun & let mother nature work it's magic. If it's warm enough, the heat from the sun can help evaporate off all that water fairly quickly. When I first learned how to make Biodiesel, this is the method I was shown.

    We'd stick 5 gallon buckets out in the hot sun with a screen over top of them & let the heat work it's magic. To see if it was done we'd point a laser at it & shine it down through the Biodiesel. If we could see the laser on the bottom of the 5 gallon drum we called it dry. Yep. Pretty simple. Pretty archaic & primitive. Probably not the best way to do it, but, it worked...at the time.

    Bubble Drying
    Another method that's a little more effective than using the sun is to use air bubbles.

    To do so, attach a bubbler to an air line, drop it into the biodiesel somewhat near the bottom and turn on the air. Then allow the air to bubble for at least 7-10 hours. Depending on ambient temperature and relative humidity in the room the biodiesel can dry fairly quickly.

    In order for this method to work well, it's important that the Biodiesel be kept warm. If using a Stand Pipe Wash Tank, an aquarium heater can be used to keep the temperature warm. We recommend keeping it at about 80-90 ° F while bubble drying.

    We stock a great Biodiesel Bubbling Kit as well as a Stainless Steel Aquarium Heater that can be used for bubble-washing.

    Recirculatory Drying
    Another extremely effective method of drying Biodiesel is to recirculate it on top of itself.


    Essentially, you rig up a pump to pull the biodiesel from the bottom of the tank and spray it back on top of itself at the top of the tank. This works so well because you actually circulate the whole batch of Biodiesel several times. The moisture evaporates away as the biodiesel is circulated.

    For this to work well, it's important to be able to heat the Biodiesel up. Typically to temperatures above 80 to 90 ° F. Once the Biodiesel is hot, simply turn on the circulatory system and allow it to do its work. After just a few hours, the Biodiesel can be completely dried.

    For more details on how this can be done we recommend visiting the following
    Drying Washed Biodiesel Article at the Collaborative Biodiesel Tutorial

    We carry a great nozzle designed to help dry Biodiesel in a circulatory system.

    Click here for more information on this great drying nozzle.
    Click here to see a video of this great nozzle in action.

    We also carry a complete oil drying tank kit!


    STEP 10 - DEALING WITH GLYCERIN | BACK TO TOP
    When Biodiesel is produced the question is often raised as to what to do with the waste glycerin that also is generated. The good news is there are several things that can be done with it. Finding the one that best fits you will be your only real challenge.

    Waste Water Treatment Plants
    Here at Utah Biodiesel Supply, we personally dispose of our glycerin by taking it to a waste-water treatment plant. The plant has a special kind of processing system called an Anaerobic Digester. It's also known as a Methane Digester as well. Basically, all of the raw sewage is mixed up in a big mixing machine and is then transferred to a big tank where bacteria feed on the raw sewage and break it down. The bacteria then produce methane gas as a by-product which is captured and then burned in the plants methane powered generator. It's a very effective use of the methane gas and adds to the recyclability of the system.

    We discovered early on that waste water treatment plants with these special digesters were willing to take crude glycerin like that produced in Biodiesel production. We called them up & asked if they'd be willing to give it a try & they were willing but they wanted to test a sample first. We took them down some of our glycerin, they pulled a sample and in a few weeks called us back & said we could bring them as much as we wanted. Turns out the crude glycerin acts like food to the bacteria and causes more methane generation to occur. Because of this the plant was willing to take all of our glycerin and we now had an environmentally friendly way to dispose of it.

    About every month or so we take about 3-5 55 gallon barrels full of crude glycerin to the plant and they take it off our hands. They don't pay us to take it but we also don't have to pay them either so it's a great arrangement. Click Here To See Us Dropping It Off

    Soap Making

    If you're interested in making Soap from your glycerin, you're in luck! We've teamed up with a great Biodieseler from Michigan that offers a great book on how to make Biodiesel glycerin soap. Click here for more details.


    He also offers a really nice soap making kit that can make up to 50 bars of Biodiesel Glycerin Soap. It comes with great instructions and even online video's to get you started.
    Click here to learn more about the kit.


    If you'd like to try some soap made from Biodiesel glycerin, we sell custom hand-made soap made from Biodiesel glycerin that's produced by Piedmont Biofuels in Pittsoboro, NC.
    Click Here to see our selection.

    Additional Uses
    For a great list of additional ways and methods to dispose of glycerin, we highly recommend visiting the "Uses for Glycerin-ByProduct" section at the Infopop Biodiesel Forum. Click here to go directly to that section.


    CONCLUSION:
    This concludes our Getting Started article on Biodiesel. We encourage you to read through our selection of other great articles on Biodiesel

    Additional Utah Biodiesel Supply Articles
    Why Biodiesel? addresses why we believe Biodiesel is such a great alternative to petro diesel
    Basics of Biodiesel explains the background of Biodiesel production including some of the chemistry
    How Its Made shows the basic theory of how Biodiesel can be produced
    Titrating Oil gives an overview of what a titration is and how it can be performed
    Using Biodiesel discusses how easy it is to use Biodiesel as a replacement for petro-diesel.


    Additional Resources
    While we have a wealth of information here, we strongly encourage you to explore some of the other great websites available that discuss how Biodiesel can be made. We also encourage you to become a part of the online Biodiesel community. You'll quickly find a vast amount of knowledge and helpful people ready to help you get started making this great renewable fuel.

    Below are a few websites that we've hand-picked that we highly recommend
    Highly Recommended! Biodiesel Safety Video Produced by Dr. Jon Van Gerpen
    Highly Recommended! Biodiesel Primer Produced by the National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service, this guide walks through the basics of getting started making a mini batch of Biodiesel.
    Highly Recommended! Biodiesel Handling & Use Guidelines Excellent guide from NREL!
    Highly Recommended! Biodiesel Safety and Best Management Practices for Small-Scale Noncommercial Use and Production Published by Pennsylvania State University as a "Best Practices" manual for Biodiesel production. Jam packed with great content and a must-read.
    Highly Recommended! Home Brew Guide Contains step by step instructions for making Biodiesel using an Appleseed processor. Also contains several testing guides.

    Make Biodiesel Website This website is absolutely fabulous! It's packed to the gills with helpful information!
    Kitchen Biodiesel A site that will walk you through the basics of making a small batch with great visuals
    Murphys Machines Visit here for great articles on Titration, Using A Syringe, How To Collect Oil, and a great chemical & methanol locator
    Biodiesel Log Allows you to easily log your Biodiesel production online!
    Biodiesel Pictures A site with tons of pictures of peoples different Biodiesel equipment.
    Infopop Biodiesel Forum Absolute best Biodiesel forum on the planet! We love this one! Go here to learn from the pros!

    And Now For Some Fun....
    To learn about some great stories about how people (including myself) got into Biodiesel in the first place Click Here!.

    Biodiesel--Semi Style
    A while back I started a thread that used "Semi-Trailers and a brick wall" as a sort of analogy to explain the chemical reactions that occur when you make Biodiesel. Click Here!

    From Crops To Biodiesel
    Click Here to read about a farmer that started with planting seeds, harvested the crop, pressed the seed for oil, and then produced his own Biodiesel. Truly a "home grown" project! It's a great story with successful results!
    2007 Crop | 2009 Crop | 2010 Fall Canola Crop | 2010/2011 Crop | 2011 Crop | 2012 Crop
    2013 Crop | All the diesels he feeds

    You Know You're A Biodiesel Nut When...
    After you've been making Biodiesel for a while you may find yourself doing some strange things. One night I started a thread on a popular Biodiesel forum I participate in where several of us "chimed in" to share the crazy things we Biodieseler's do once we get hooked.
    Click here to enjoy the fun!

    Funny Captions To Biodiesel Pictures
    Just to show that we don't take ourselves too seriously, a prominent Biodieseler started this hilarious thread where we post some of our nutty Biodiesel pictures and others chime in with fun captions. Click here to see the fun!


    Contact Us!
    As always, we're here to help you get off to a great start! If you have questions about making Biodiesel, feel free to contact us. We're always happy to help out and, if we don't know the answer, you can bet we'll know where to direct you. We've been involved with Biodiesel since 2003 and we're still crazy about it and enjoy helping people out all the time!

    Best of luck to you as you begin your journey with Biodiesel. Just watch out! Once it gets ahold of you, it can be very addicting (something about saving gobs of money while having fun at the same time I suppose).

    Thanks for stopping by & here's hoping your Biodiesel adventures are as fun as ours have been!


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